Create Space for Equity Series

The "How to Create Space for Equity" series was born out of the desire to create conversation. We want to learn from other organizations who face oppression and inequity, and see how that intersects with audism and ableism. Learning and growing from these parallels are imperative to overcome barriers in our community.

This conversation is provided in American Sign Language and in English.

If your organization is interested in working with Adjacent Space please email us at info@adjacentspace.org

Magic City Acceptance Center (MCAC) - November 12

In this talk MCAC and Adjacent Space share about the experiences of racism and homophobia intersecting with the experiences of audism and ableism, and how we all can make our communities stronger by breaking down barriers, and including more people at the table.

Lauren Jacobs is the Youth Programs Coordinator at Magic City Acceptance Center (MCAC) in Birmingham, Alabama. At MCAC, Lauren provides community building, sexual wellness/healthy relationship education, and STI testing and for LGBTQ youth ages 13-24. 

Lauren was a principal organizer for the Southeastern LGBTQ Student Leadership Conference, offering space for hundreds of students to build a diverse community of LGBTQ southerners.  She has contributed writing to Autostraddle.com, the world's biggest queer women's website, and served as associate producer to Alabama Bound, an award-winning documentary that has brought stories of lesbian families in Alabama to screens around the country.     

Trey Gordon is the President for Adjacent Space and the brains behind the direction and shape of the non profit structure. He drives the mission, policies, procedures and facilitates many conversations through events such as Think Tank. 

Trey Gordon is fully Deaf (emphasis on capitalization of “D” in deaf). He grew up in Alabama, attended the state school for the Deaf, and went to Gallaudet University, the only university in the world whose primary language in its college curriculum is ASL. After receiving his bachelor’s degree, he lived in India for almost four months serving their Deaf community, and learning Indian Sign Language.  He then went on to complete a masters’ degree in public administration and a certificate in nonprofit management. His experience and upbringing led him to notice omissions and failures to recognize the needs of our communities, and he wanted to be a part of a grassroots-fueled organization that could revolutionize the community with accessibility.